A Wrinkle in Time

by Madeleine L'Engle
Year Published: 1962
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)

2017 Mathical Hall of Fame Book

Meg Murry, her little brother Charles Wallace, and their mother are having a midnight snack on a dark and stormy night when an unearthly stranger appears at their door. She claims to have been blown off course, and goes on to tell them that there is such a thing as a “tesseract,” which, if you didn’t know, is a wrinkle in time.

Meg’s father had been experimenting with time-travel when he suddenly disappeared. Will Meg, Charles Wallace, and their friend Calvin outwit the forces of evil as they search through space for their father?

“A Newbery Award winner, A Wrinkle in Time is an iconic novel that continues to inspire millions of fans around the world.” – Publisher’s 50th anniversary edition

“A book, too, can be a star, explosive material, capable of stirring up fresh life endlessly, a living fire to lighten the darkness, leading out into the expanding universe.” – Madeleine L’Engle

Other Resources

Author website

Author biography

Teachingbooks.net book page

A mathematical look at A Wrinkle in Time, by Jessica Weare

What exactly is a tesseract? “One concept L’Engle explored in the book was tessering, a method whereby people could traverse great distances in the universe by “folding” space and time. Although they don’t behave in exactly the way L’Engle describes, tesseracts do exist, and serve as important and elegant examples of multidimensional space. An actual tesseract is best described as a four dimensional cube… and is kind of confusing. So, in memory of L’Engle, NPR’s Bryant Park Project met up with Physicist David Morgan who took a little time out of his day to talk tesseracts… ”